CWV – Computer

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION

Balance Between Sophisticated and Community


As computer technology becomes increasingly important, the number of careers in this field continues to grow. Computer and Information Science (CIS) offers students the opportunity to study this dynamic science. Minor in computer information technology (CIT) teaches students about the development and management of business databases, computer networks, web applications, and software systems.

CIS scholars can choose to specialize. Software engineering, for example, focuses on software design and development. The network emphasizes interconnection between individual computers. Cognitive science examines the relationship between computers and psychology, linguistics, and neuroscience. Graduate school options prepare students to pursue advanced degrees and conduct research.

Choosing specialties helps focus students while combining various subjects and other interests. This type of interdisciplinary approach is very relevant because innovation in this field leaps forward.

CIS organizes many social functions where students can meet graduate students and faculty members in a relaxed atmosphere. CIS has a strong peer advisory program, which provides academic counseling, guidance and information to scholars about work and internships. The Women’s group in Computer Science allows undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members to gather for discussions, guest speeches, and social events.

At the University of Oregon, CIS balances the study of current issues with the support of close communities.

Interesting place


Scholars have the opportunity to participate in research investigating topics such as artificial intelligence, human-computer interaction, and theoretical computer science.
Every summer UO organizes Programming Languages ​​Summer School, an international meeting consisting of students, professors, and industry professionals who gather to learn about the application of methods in language theory.


Every year the department participates in the International Collegiate Programming Contest. Sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery, ICPC is a competition between student program teams to see which teams can solve the most programming problems in a short time.
Course Example


Multimedia on the Web introduces the basics of web communication, web page functions, and design. Students become familiar with digital media including graphics, animation, video and sound, and use software to create interactive multimedia documents.


An introduction to Artificial Intelligence explores the theory and specific examples of knowledge-based computer systems.


The Database System is an introduction to database design and access, focusing on database concepts, data modeling, normalization, data warehousing, query languages, and complex question formulation.


Cryptography is an introduction to coding theory and the process of randomizing plain text into ciphetext.


Network Security provides an overview of network security issues, looks at some of the most representative security issues, and investigates common solutions.


Programming Language explores syntax and semantics by focusing on the rules of scope, environment, store, values, procedures, and parameters that are symbolized and expressed.
Data Mining offers an introduction to basic problems, algorithms, results, and data mining applications through the study of methods for data management, feature selection, statistical modeling, and data grouping.


See more courses offered by the Department of Computer Science and Information.
Direct Learning


UO offers many research opportunities. Some possibilities for scholars include joining a research group, writing a thesis, or participating in research during the summer. The first step is to get to know the faculty and the research they are doing. Kolokia Introduction to Research for Bachelor offers an overview of several faculty member research projects. When you find your field of interest, make an appointment with the appropriate faculty member.

Internships are another option, providing students with practical work experience and usually offering a combination of credit and / or payment. There are usually a number of local opportunities throughout the year, as well as many summer internships involving trips.